Songs

Johnson | Lawes | Locke | Blow | Purcell

CREATED at the Schwetzingen Festival on 27 May 2016

MUSICAL DIRECTOR
Sébastien Daucé
ENSEMBLE CORRESPONDANCES

STAGING Samuel Achache
SCENOGRAPHY Lisa Navarro
DRAMATURGY Sarah Le Picard
COSTUMES Pauline Kieffer
LIGHTING Cesar Godefroy
STAGING ASSISTANT Carla Bouis
WRITING PARTNER Julien Villa


  • CAST 

    ALTO Lucile Richardot
    ACTORS Margot Alexandre and Sarah Le Picard

  • PROGRAM 

    WORKS BY Matthew Locke, Robert Johnson, John Jenkins, John Blow, Henry Purcell, Robert Ramsery, Giovianni Coperario, William Lowes

  • PRODUCTION / CO-PRODUCTION 

    PRODUCTION
    Ensemble Correspondances et la vie brève

    CO-PRODUCTION
    Théâtre de Caen, Théâtre de Lorient -  Centre dramatique national de Bretagne, Comédie de Valence - Centre dramatique national Drôme-Ardèche, Théâtre de Cornouaille - Scène nationale de Quimper – Centre de création musicale, Fondation Royaumont avec le soutien de la Fondation Daniel et Nina Carasso, Théâtre de Choisy-le-Roi, scène conventionnée d’intérêt national art & création - pour la diversité linguistique, Théâtre de la Croix- Rousse avec l’aide du Centre culturel de rencontre d’Ambronay et de la Fondation Musica Solis

    IN COLLABORATION WITH
    le Théâtre Dijon Bourgogne - CDN

From 1630 to 1690, what was happening in England? 

While Italy gave birth to a new genre, the opera, which was about to take Continental Europe by storm,  another form of increasingly dramatic vocal art flourished on the other side of the Channel: songs. Alongside the advances made by the Italians Caccini and Monteverdi, a new type of accompanied monody developed in 17thcentury England, whose insularity – both in terms of geography and character! – has no like elsewhere in the world. While John Dowland clearly dominated the first half of the century, the musical revolution that followed his death in 1626 with the creation of Purcell’s Dido and Aeneasat the end of 1689 remains today as fascinating as it is misunderstood. It is this exhilarating transition period that Sébastien Daucé and his ensemble Correspondances have chosen to examine in their new stage show. Conceived for the voice of Lucile Richardot — who opened from several metres in height the Royal Ballet of the Night— this  musical flowering, where melancholy remains an omnipresent and specifically English ingredient, benefits from rich dramaturgy and staging by Samuel Achache, in the form of a bitter-sweet voyage through the heart and mind of a woman in love.

Add to calendar
Grand Theatre
  • May 2020
    • Wednesday 06 at 20:00
    • Thursday 07 at 20:00
PRICE SPECIAL - CONCERT 2
From 5,50€ to 35€
Duration
1h40

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